Mexico City Travel Guide

Mexico, Photography, Travel

In March I visited Mexico for the first time to eat all the food and see all the art. I’m not a beach/resort person so we visited Mexico City. It was an amazing experience exploring this massive, crazy city. There are so many district areas/neighbourhoods to explore and in 5 days we saw so much of the city and ate so much amazing food.

Àbadakone|Continuous Fire|Feu continuel

Art, Ottawa

Àbadakone|Continuous Fire|Feu continuel at the National Gallery of Canada had ended after an amazing (an extended run thanks to Covid). This amazing exhibition featuring the work of more than 70 international contemporary Indigenous artists from 16 countires is one of those exhibitions that makes the National Gallery of Canada a special institution. Even though this exhibition is over I wanted to share some images of it.

Museo Casa Estudio Diego Rivera y Frida Kahlo

Mexico, Travel

The Museo Casa Estudio Diego Rivera y Frida Kahlo was the home of the two famed Mexican artists in the southern San Ángel neighbourhood of Mexico City. The striking modern house, not far from Kahlo’s family home was built by Mexican architect and painter Juan O’Gorman. The house was a joint design project between the three artists, O’Gorman even had his own separate section of the house. The house is unique, not just in its modern design but also because it was divided into different buildings to allow each artist to have their own private area and studio but still be connected to each other. Rivera and Kahlo’s part of the home is connected by a rooftop bridge that is visually reflective of their relationship. The couple only lived in the house from 1934-1940.

Frida Kahlo at the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec & Covid-19

Art, Canada, Québec, Québec City, Travel

On our way home from a little weekend trip to northern Québec we decide to take a little detour to pass through Québec City to see the exhibition Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera and Mexican Modernism: The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection at the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec. I had hoped to write a little review of this exhibition but instead I’m going to share my experience of visiting a blockbuster exhibition in the time of Covid-19. 

Hanran Exhibition Review at the National Gallery of Canada

Art, Ottawa
“Hanran, a Japanese word meaning flood, overflow, or deluge.” These words reflect the period of immense change in Japan that occurred throughout the 62 year Shōwa Era (1926-89). The new exhibition, Hanran: 20th Century Japanese Photographyat the National Gallery of Canada, organized by the Yokohama Museum of Art, offers us a glimpse into that tumultuous time in Japanese society. 

Brian Jungen Friendship Centre at the AGO

Art, Toronto

Last time I was down around Toronto I stopped into the Art Gallery of Ontario to see their new exhibition, Brian Jungen Friendship Centre (June 20 – August 25, 2019). Jungen is a Dane-Zaa / Swiss artist based in British Columbia. Although a lot of his artwork is related to his Indigenous heritage he also looks at issues of environmentalism and consumerism. Jungen is probably best know for his mask sculptures that use Nike Air Jordan sneakers to create Indigenous style masks. The new exhibition at the AGO is the largest exhibition of his work and is meant to be an in-depth exploration of his artwork.

Karim Rashid Exhibit Review at the Ottawa Art Gallery

Art, Ottawa

The Ottawa Art Gallery‘s current exhibition Karim Rashid: Cultural Shaping presents “the first large-scale presentation of the iconic designer’s work in Canada to date.” It features over 200 of Rashid’s unique designs ranging from tables and chairs to shoes and Pepsi bottles. I was interested to see this exhibition since it’s rare that we see these kinds of design exhibits in Ottawa and I wanted to learn more about this designer who I only vaguely knew. However, after seeing the exhibit I feel like I really didn’t learn anything and instead visited a showroom, not a gallery.

Anthropocene Exhibition Review – Part 2

Art, Toronto

A little while has past since I saw the Anthropocene exhibition at the Art Gallery of Ontario – AGO in Toronto, and it’s given me some time to reflect. Since then I’ve even gone back to the National Gallery of Canada to see their iteration of the exhibition again, read my review here! It’s hard not to compare and contrast the two approaches to the exhibition and its design since I studied curating in university so now going to exhibitions I find it really hard not to critic everything from wall colour, text panels and lighting to the overarching curatorial idea and artworks themselves. But it’s also rare that you get to see essentially the same exhibit done in two different ways. 

Anthropocene Exhibition Review – Part 1

Art, Ottawa

Anthropocene is a new exhibition at the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa. It includes work by renowned Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky and Emmy award-winning documentary filmmakers Jennifer Baichwal and Nicholas de Pencier. The exhibition “explore the impact of human activity on Earth through photography, film installations and interactive technologies.” The exhibition runs until February 24th, 2019. Its companion exhibition at the Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto runs until January 6th, 2019, which will be part 2 of my review that you can read here